Alternative Medicine

By Dr. Peter Abaci Don’t be surprised if the next time you see your doctor they suggest you go to an acupuncturist. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently released a recommendation that doctors get up to speed on complementary alternative therapies for treating pain including acupuncture and chiropractic treatment.
We’ve all uttered the words “You are stressing me out!”, “This is so stressful!”, “I’m under so much stress at work”, “I’m feeling stressed out”, so I think we consider stress something that we are under or something that’s putting, well, stress on us.
Many people mistakenly believe that the only way to treat chronic pain is by taking painkillers, says Stanford pain psychologist Beth Darnall, Ph.D. She believes there is a better way to manage pain that doesn’t involve pills. In her new book, The Opioid-Free Pain Relief Kit: 10 Simple Steps to Ease Your Pain, she outlines a plan to empower chronic pain sufferers to gain control over their pain.
Although I am not an advocate of relying on supplements to get proper nutrition (I always recommend food, first and foremost), they can be extremely helpful in our toxic and stress-filled lives, and especially when needing to target specific issues.
Optimize your mind-body connection with information and resources that empower you to reduce pain and its impact on your brain and body. (1) Understanding Pain in less than 5 minutes, and what to do about it! (5:00) View it here. (2) Learn out Pain Psychology (12:47) View it here.
pic of stormy clouds over beach
By Dr. Peter Abaci
Cupping, taping, acupuncture, massage… anything for the competitive advantage, as seen quite visibly on Michael Phelps’ cupping marks in this year’s Olympic games. The world’s top men’s swimmer is one of the most well known elite athletes reaching to alternative therapies left and right. Other highly visible Olympians using unconventional performance boosters include beach volleyball players and their brightly colored physio-tape.
By Dr. Peter Abaci What do you do when your doctor diagnoses you with a herniated disc in your lower back? Well, first off don’t panic! How you approach this new piece of information has a lot to do with your particular clinical situation. For starters, think closely about where you feel your pain. Is it mostly in your lower back, or do you feel the most intense symptoms going down one leg?
glasses on book - Image courtesy of Michelle Meiklejohn at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
This is Health Revolution Radio with Dr. Peter Abaci. Today's topic: Why We Write   Image courtesy of Michelle Meiklejohn at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
The National Pain Report published an interview to address the question - what happens after opioids are limited or stopped? Patients with chronic pain are being unfairly punished for the actions of addicts. And, importantly: how do we treat pain differently? Beth Darnall, PhD addresses all of these questions and more.

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