Brain & Pain

I recently met a a very kind man, Dr Chuck Wall, a retired professor and our local motivational speaker. He has been on Oprah and invited by Presidents to the White House on several occasions. Out of his kindness, he is helping me improve my public speaking skills for free. He is blind but is living a full life. I have a great time with him – we go walking, we go for lunches, we spend many valuable and enjoyable hours together in which I always...
In May of 2012, I completed the Meditation Teacher Training program at the Chopra Center for Well-being in San Diego, certifying me to teach Primordial Sound Meditation. While at the world-renowned center, I got to listen to Deepak Chopra, one of my role models. Somebody in audience asked him: ’Deepak why did you start to meditate?’ His answer was simple: ’Because I wanted to quit smoking and drinking. It was many years ago.’
Think of pain as being your “harm alarm,” a signal that is designed to get your attention, to motivate you to escape whatever is causing it. After all, pain—potential harm—could mean injury or even death.  In this way, pain serves a useful purpose because it is functions to keep you safe and alive.  This all works quite well if you simply cut your finger while dicing vegetables for dinner.
I was honored to be interviewed by Pain Pathways Magazine about Less Pain, Fewer Pills: Avoid the dangers of prescription opioids and gain control over chronic pain (Bull Publishing). Though Less Pain, Fewer Pills published almost 2 years ago, today it is more relevant than ever.
With the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) opening its doors to psychologists in 2015, the pain community has been witnessing a shift in how these healthcare professionals are being included in annual pain conference symposia.
While near-death experiences are typically recounted as pleasant and uplifting: visions of pure light, verdant landscapes and dazzlingly clear skies, accompanied by an overwhelming sense of bliss — not everyone has a pleasant or loving near-death episode. Less reported are the accounts of nightmarish and painfully hellish experiences: terrifying deities, gruesome apparitions, and painful torture. These accounts may include a life-review process...
By Dr. Peter Abaci A common complaint for many with chronic pain problems like arthritis, back pain, fibromyalgia, and CRPS is difficulty with memory and just not feeling mentally sharp. Brain research seems to back up the mental cloudiness that many in pain experience on a routine basis. Chronic pain is often associated with anatomical changes within the brain, including an overall loss of gray matter and a shrinking of areas of the brain...
Neon light in the shape of a head and brain
This is Health Revolution Radio, today's topic: Exercise to a Better Brain Guest Speakers: Laurann Putnam and Jackie Crowell
Focus written on clenched fist
This is Health Revolution Radio, today's topic: Willpower Guest Speaker: Dr. John Mckellar Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
In late January 2016, Pain Medicine published the article "Pain Psychology: A Global Needs Assessment and National Call to Action." The article is available free of charge here.

Pages

Connect with Us

 

Go to top