Surgeries

Taylor Nared has known since she was a teenager that she was facing tough health choices relatively few other women will confront — about raising a family, about her body’s integrity, about her very survival. Perched on her family tree were several women who had breast cancer. And running along its branches all the way to her mother was a mutated gene that boosts the risk of developing cancer of the breasts and ovaries.
Dr. Paul Lynch was on the Dr. Oz Show this week to discuss epidural steroid injections, which were portrayed in a controversial light.  Following the segment Dr. Lynch posted this response to the interview on his website, paindoctor.com. 
Who is regulating health care, anyway? In Take Charge of Your Chronic Pain I discussed how profitable treating pain is for corporate America. That includes publicly traded pharmaceutical companies and device makers, as well as hospitals, surgery centers, and medical practices. Market forces often seem to drive the type of care provided to patients, as opposed to adhering to best practice guidelines or Evidence-Based Medicine.
Doctors have long resorted to the knife to treat certain painful conditions, but the use of many surgeries for the treatment of chronic pain—as opposed to those for acute injuries like fractures and tears—remains controversial. There are still many questions to be answered, even about more common surgeries such as spine surgery. For example, where does low back surgery fit in for the treatment of chronic low back pain? And what does your doctor...

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