Treatments

This video is for people suffering from recent knee surgeries/injuries.
As you may have read in the news, Tiger Woods is recovering from a recent back surgery – his fourth back operation in the past few years (this one being a fusion). Once the greatest golfer in the world, Tiger had his first surgery in 2014, but since then, even after two more surgeries, has not been able to successfully return to the pro tour. No doubt he is hoping that this recent operation will eventually get him to a place where he can...
By Dr. Peter Abaci If you’ve seen the regular stream of stories in the media about the “opioid epidemic,” the thought of starting an opioid pain medication might make you a little uneasy. But if you are scheduled for an elective surgery, dental work, or experience an acute injury, your doctor is likely to prescribe one – an estimated 1 out of every 5 patients with non-cancer pain are prescribed opioids by their doctors. So how can you make sure...
Do You Have Supple, Strong, Stable Cells? When I first learned about connective tissue, scientifically called fascia, I was told it was an “accessory tissue.” What does that even mean? Why would my body have any accessory item in it at all? It turns out there’s nothing accessory about fascia.
We’ve all uttered the words “You are stressing me out!”, “This is so stressful!”, “I’m under so much stress at work”, “I’m feeling stressed out”, so I think we consider stress something that we are under or something that’s putting, well, stress on us.
As I’ve said in trainings and even on TV, “Sometimes I like wearing high heels. I won’t give up my Jimmy Choos, but I don’t want to pay the price of vanity.” Research clearly shows that there are some seriously negative effects of wearing high heels daily. So whether you wear them every day or just for special occasions, there’s some cause and effect that you should consider if, like me, you are hell bent on not ditching your heels.
At the Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab, one of our active research studies is focused on how to help prepare people who are heading to surgery. We are equipping them with the information and skills they can use to reduce their own distress and discomfort after surgery. Ideally, this helps people need less pain medication.
Many people mistakenly believe that the only way to treat chronic pain is by taking painkillers, says Stanford pain psychologist Beth Darnall, Ph.D. She believes there is a better way to manage pain that doesn’t involve pills. In her new book, The Opioid-Free Pain Relief Kit: 10 Simple Steps to Ease Your Pain, she outlines a plan to empower chronic pain sufferers to gain control over their pain.

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