Drug Addiction

CHICAGO — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments.

Sarah Sherbert’s first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed...

A Republican-led legislative panel rejected a bipartisan bill Wednesday to allow Denver to create a supervised injection site for drug users, despite pleas from public health experts and relatives of overdose victims.

By Marley Jay and Matt Perrone, The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The maker of the powerful painkiller OxyContin said it will stop marketing opioid drugs to doctors, bowing to a key demand of lawsuits that blame the company for helping trigger the current drug abuse epidemic.

Andrew Turner’s years in the military left him suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, back pain and the effects of an injury that mangled his hand. “I was a broken toy,” he said. Tossed aside. Barely able to get off the couch.

Then he started using an herbal supplement that he says saved his life: kratom.

They arrive before the sun, lining up for a lifeline that comes in a shot of pink liquid.

The doors to the methadone clinic on the campus of Denver Health open before dawn, and the line stretches down one side of the clinic hallway and back up the other. One at a time, patients swig a cup of methadone passed through an opening from the other side of a protective window.

Months after a bipartisan legislative panel approved the measure, the door to opening a supervised injection site for drug users in Colorado is closing at the state Capitol.

Months after a bipartisan legislative panel approved the measure, the door to opening a supervised injection site for drug users in Colorado is closing at the state Capitol.

The first rehab for heroin addiction didn’t work, nor the second. She left a 28-day program on day 24.

But after facing a judge and coming to a realization — “Either I was going to die or I was going to get well” — Kiyoka Tamesue finally ended up getting treatment that worked for her, including an outpatient program at Arapahoe House.

Amid an ongoing epidemic of opioid and heroin overdoses, Colorado’s largest provider of treatment for drug and alcohol abuse will close its doors early next year, the victim of long-running financial losses and low government payments.

Colorado’s opioid crisis is taking center stage at the state Capitol as policymakers look to curtail the drug abuse that is killing hundreds each year.

Pages

Connect with Us

 

Go to top