Surgeries

I was pleased to be invited by Nature to give my thoughts on what is needed in pain research and care ("To treat pain, study people in all their complexity"). Too often, the person is forgotten while the symptom is treated. Our systems must account for the individual variability in the experience and treatment of pain, and to address the unique needs of each person.
The April 2018 issue of O Magazine includes a few of my comments in an article that is addresses addiction risks for opioids ("Why prescription opioids are so addictive" by Peg Rosen). What's not stated in this article is my belief that opioids can and do help some people living with chronic pain.
Michael Sullivan, PT, MSPT is the Director of Rehabilitation Services at the Bay Area Pain and Wellness Center. Mr. Sullivan's lecture deals with one of the many issues that people with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome struggle with--that movement is painful, to the point where individuals with CRPS don't feel they have the choice to be active. The lecture also talks about neuroplasticity, graded motor imagery, mirror box therapy, and virtual...
As you may have read in the news, Tiger Woods is recovering from a recent back surgery – his fourth back operation in the past few years (this one being a fusion). Once the greatest golfer in the world, Tiger had his first surgery in 2014, but since then, even after two more surgeries, has not been able to successfully return to the pro tour. No doubt he is hoping that this recent operation will eventually get him to a place where he can compete...
By Dr. Peter Abaci
At the Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab, one of our active research studies is focused on how to help prepare people who are heading to surgery. We are equipping them with the information and skills they can use to reduce their own distress and discomfort after surgery. Ideally, this helps people need less pain medication.
This is Health Revolution Radio with Dr. Peter Abaci. Today's topic: Recovering from Knee Injuries Guest Speakers: Dr. John Kao and Lianna Roberts Image courtesy of stockdevil at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
By Dr. Peter Abaci What do you do when your doctor diagnoses you with a herniated disc in your lower back? Well, first off don’t panic! How you approach this new piece of information has a lot to do with your particular clinical situation. For starters, think closely about where you feel your pain. Is it mostly in your lower back, or do you feel the most intense symptoms going down one leg?
I believe coming here to learn about pain treatments should be a special experience. This should be a place where you can be confident of receiving straight talk with an emphasis on scientific studies and outcomes from experienced providers. We recognize that there are many ways of treating pain problems which can make it challenging for the individual looking to find high-quality and meaningful treatments that deliver impactful results.
By Dr. Peter Abaci

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