Treatments

Pain management is an important consideration when you’re having surgery – not only to minimize discomfort, but also because go
Our experience of pain can have a lot to do with our past – especially when our past includes trauma.
If you are going to see a doctor today, then it is probably because something hurts somewhere in your body. Pain is the number one reason why a patient goes to the doctor, with over half of all doctor visits attributed to either some type of joint problem or to back pain.
As scientists and physicians race to explore new and more effective strategies to treat pain, many are investigating how techno
When someone is in pain, their whole family is impacted.
We all know someone who has had knee surgery or a knee replacement, or who was forced to live a more sedentary lifestyle because of knee issues. This person might even be you. You are not alone. In fact, knee pain is the second most common type of chronic pain. A third of all Americans report experiencing knee pain at some time or another. And roughly 3 million women and 1.7 million men are living with total knee replacements.
I was pleased to be invited by Nature to give my thoughts on what is needed in pain research and care ("To treat pain, study people in all their complexity"). Too often, the person is forgotten while the symptom is treated. Our systems must account for the individual variability in the experience and treatment of pain, and to address the unique needs of each person.
The April 2018 issue of O Magazine includes a few of my comments in an article that is addresses addiction risks for opioids ("Why prescription opioids are so addictive" by Peg Rosen). What's not stated in this article is my belief that opioids can and do help some people living with chronic pain.
I was pleased to be invited by Scientific American to post a blog describing our work on targeted mindset interventions for pain relief and opioid reduction.
Chronic pain affects up to one-third of the world population. We recognize that an individual approach to treating pain is needed and that for some patients, prescription opioids are necessary. However, the overemphasis on treating chronic pain with opioids has been associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. With 6.8% of the U.S. population now taking long-term opioids, there is an urgent need to reduce opioids and patient risks and to...

Pages